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Coaching: Distribution – Under Arm Roll

Part 4 – Under-Arm Roll Out

So to the final part of our journey on Distribution after previously looking at kicking (Dead ball kicking http://wp.me/p27nBU-cQ and Kicking from hands http://wp.me/p27nBU-d4) and throwing (Over Arm Throw http://wp.me/p27nBU-d6), we now take a look at the Under-Arm Roll Out.

Like all of the distribution methods practice can make perfect and even though this is seen as the easiest of all 4 distribution methods it can still be rushed and guidance may be needed to our younger student Goalkeepers or even to just give a reminder of the basics to those more experienced Goalkeepers to hone their technique.

So as before, lets look at what is the right technique:

Figure 1

Again the basic technique is as easy as 1-2-3, in one smooth movement, like rolling a bowling ball…

The steps then are as follows:

  • Look at your target;
  • Hold the ball in your throwing hand, with the opposite foot forward (i.e. If you throwing hand is your right hand, place your left foot forward) as seen in Figure 1 – Step 1;
  • Moving the ball forward, start crouching down, with opposite foot still forward, and the rear leg now bending so that the knee eventually touches the floor;
  • Still moving the ball forward, with the throwing arm going past the now bent rear leg (almost brushing it) as per Figure 1 – Step 2;
  • Watching the ball now;
  • Rolling through along the ground and releasing, with the throwing arm carrying through in motion after release of the ball as per Figure 1 – Step 3;
  • After release of the ball look to your target; and
  • If required to promote follow through of the arm, get them to point at the target they have just rolled to afterwards.

To progress things there are some useful exercises that can be used:

  • Put balls (of different sizes) mounted on cones out at appropriate distances, and encourage them to knock these balls off the cones by rolling out; or
  • Again for that game scenario (and to encourage accuracy) get them to roll out to a target area – although unlike kicking and throwing, the distances this time are not as far… – Set out a box with marker cones on different parts of the field at appropriate distances. Having a coach/keeper/player in that box to collect the ball with hands/feet. If using another keeper they could work together rolling the ball to each other in boxes/target areas whilst you as a coach look on/or assist; and
  • Mix it up a bit, so they roll left and right… creating some movement from the Goalkeeper, maybe have more than one option for them on different parts of the field. Getting them to look for who to roll to before they roll out the ball or even get some communication going between Goalkeeper and outfield

Also, it is not set in stone to just practice one distribution technique in an exercise, so to really mix things up, you could set out targets at varying distances, or get target coach/keeper/player to move about encouraging different techniques. Meaning that they may need to Kicking from hands, Over Arm Throw, Under-Arm Roll Out, or even off the floor Dead ball kicking style… Which now starts to encourage the decision-making process (Psychological and Technical)…

This series was just 4 of the distribution techniques Goalkeepers can use. There are others, however these are the main ones that a young student Goalkeeper should learn. They will all need practice to improve on and again I stress for patience, as practice can eventually make perfect… The top Goalkeepers seen at Euro 2012 this month have all had to perfect their distribution techniques, and for them too, this did not happen overnight. It took years of practice. So no pressure, take your time and above all have fun doing it! ūüėČ

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To K or not to K?

Through the continual development of my Goalkeeper Coaching, I have observed and been taught various coaching techniques and styles. Understanding that different coaching methods suit different abilities, ages or situations in game play. The one coaching technique that seems to have a varying degree of opinion is the scoop technique and the use of (or not) the ‘K-Position’.

There are different schools of thought when it comes to the ‘K-Position’, but each do have their own merits, albeit in differing situations.

The following diagram (figure 1), shows 3 figures doing 3 types of scoop catches.

The Scoop Save - Which of the 3 is the best?

figure 1

1. Shows the Goalkeeper reaching down to the floor with feet close together, using the hands to let the ball roll up them, scooping the ball, eventually pulling the ball into the chest.

2. Shows the start of a ‘K-Position’ but not actually allowing the bent knee to fully touch the floor. Again¬†using the hands to let the ball roll up them, scooping the ball.

3. Shows the ‘K-Position’. This is similar to 2., but with the bent knee touching the floor.

The biggest advantage of ‘K-Position’ is that by putting the knee down creates a second barrier, so that as a Goalkeeper you have a safeguard behind your hands acting as another ‘barrier’ in front of goal, that the ball would hit, if the ball does get through the hands…

However the ‘K-Position’ has a big¬†disadvantage¬†too, just ask Rob Green…

image from smh.com.au

image from smh.com.au

As we saw in the 2010 World Cup, when England played the USA, Rob Green had to deal with what seemed a tame shot. He made the decision to use the ‘K-Position’, and saw the ball end up in the back of the net. For the biggest disadvantage of the ‘K-Position’¬†is that once committed to it, your movement as a Goalkeeper is limited, so if the ball hits a divot and changes direction you are already committed and will find it as difficult as Rob Green did to recover…

This doesn’t mean that the¬†‘K-Position’ is truly bad, if used when completely behind a ball (ensuring movement to get into a position to take behind the ball), it is can be very effective. So one school of thought is to use it when dealing with slower balls… Or as Figure 1 drawing 2, to coach the Goalkeeper to not let the knee fully touch the ground as then you are not fully committed and have a little more flexibility in movement.

The other school of thought though, is not to use it at all, and to just coach as Figure 1 drawing 1, ensuring that the feet are not too far apart, so that the legs can become the second barrier. That if needed, when dealing with a faster ball, to either do a collapsing save (dropping down straight on top of the ball) or to smother the ball (by scoping the ball up but dropping forward onto the ball).

Which ever school of thought, each can be used and each have their merits…¬†of which I am slowly starting to learn more about, and also of what their drawbacks might be. It is our job as Goalkeeper coaches to therefore understand each and of which would best suit the Goalkeepers we train. We can then assist them to make¬†the¬†right decision… However, that said, with the many different¬†scenarios¬†that could present themselves to a Goalkeeper in an¬†actual¬†game, it can sometime be difficult for any Goalkeeper to ensure that they make exactly the right choice. For they can only make one, which will be in the split second they have to think about it and one that they feel is the right one to do at¬†the¬†time.

Understanding these different techniques and deciding when to use and not to use which one, is why the life as a Goalkeeper has its challenges. With¬†the¬†biggest challenge being the critics, especially those who aren’t¬†conscious¬†of¬†the¬†fact that Goalkeepers have so many choices to make. As¬†Rob Green discovered, choosing the ‘K-Position’, seemed right at¬†the¬†time (as it would for most Goalkeepers), as this seemed such a straight forward catch… but as we all saw it was a decision that meant yet again another Goalkeeper was to be slated by our unforgiving press. ¬†Just look at Joe Hart over¬†the¬†last 2 weeks, a hero for England against Brazil and then a¬†Villain¬†for Manchester City… or the ever slated David deGea, now lauded as one of the best Goalkeepers after his heroics for Manchester United to deny Real Madrid… and all because of¬†the¬†choices made… Who’d be a Goalkeeper… me definitely – it’s just too much fun! ūüėČ

Team GB football goes for gold?

So the exciting Goalkeeping that is Jack Butland may not have got a start at Euro2012 with two more experienced keepers getting in his way, but he will get the chance now on the Olympic stage.

Birmingham City’s Jack Butland joins the impressive young Middlesbrough Goalkeeper Jason Steele in the newly formed Team GB for this summers Olympics.

Image from www.mfc.co.uk

Could they pick up deserved medals? Well it might not necessarily be Gold with In form Brazilian and Spanish teams. Then again in knockout competitions any one can dream…

The dream though has better odds for the Women’s football under the experienced guidance of Hope Powell, with the chance of watching the great Women’s Goalkeeping talents of Linkoping’s Karen Bardsley and Everton Ladies’ Rachel Brown.

Image from www.corren.se

For years Women’s football has been overshadowed by the Men’s but could the Women now get one over the Men by getting the Gold they deserve?

With the Goalkeepers in both teams they certainly both stand a chance of keeping it tight at the back so they should have the confidence to attack and get the goals needed – so both indeed have every chance of success… So come on Great Britain lets all cheer on these Great Britons!

Euro 2012 stats continued – Is Iker Casillas the greatest ever?

Euro 2012 Stats Part Two: The remaining stats awards…

I looked at the number of shots¬†Spain’s¬†Iker¬†Casillas¬†had to deal with on goal and wondered if he was actually one of the¬†best Goalkeepers in Europe as it seemed that he hadn’t necessarily been tested. However when I looked started calculating the stats from the tournament I could believe my eyes when he almost wiped the floor of awards on offer… I say almost as there was only one he did not get, which was the busiest keeper, but then with the Spanish defence and an average team possession of approximately 60% he was never likely to be… but he showed just why indeed he deserved to be classed as one of the best Goalkeepers in Europe and indeed the World…

So from the stats Iker Casillas picks up the awards for:

  • The¬†Golden Glove – Most Clean Sheets¬†–¬†Iker¬†had¬†5 clean sheets in total from the¬†6 games he played, with the next best being 2 clean sheets from 4 other Goalkeepers (England’s Joe Hart, Italy’s Gianluigi Buffon, Portugal’s Rui Patricio and Greece’s Michalis¬†Sifakis);
  • Clean Sheets vs Games Played – An impressive 83.33% with the next best being Greece’s Michalis¬†Sifakis at 66.67%;
  • Clean Sheets vs Shots on Goal¬†– Even though (as we previously saw in the last post) Iker had only 16 shots at goal to cope with, with keeping 5 clean sheets meant that he topped the charts at 31.25%, with the next best being again Greece’s¬†Michalis¬†Sifakis and Portugal’s¬†Rui Patricio at 13.33%;
  • Meanest Keeper Part 1 : Goals Conceded vs Shots on Goal¬†– Iker¬†only conceded 1 goal in the whole tournament meaning his ratio was at 6.25 %, with the next best being England’s Joe Hart at 9.09%; and
  • Meanest Keeper Part 2 : Goals Conceded vs Games Played¬†– this has got to be the greatest stat of the lot with playing 6 games and conceding only 1 means that Iker¬†has a phenomenally low 0.17%. No other Goalkeeper could come close with the next best being Poland’s Przemyslaw¬†Tyton at 0.67%.

I think I speak for many Goalkeeping fans when I say Wow – What a great Goalkeeper. The stats say it all – he most definitely deserves the accolades!

Here are the stats in full for all of these awards:

  Player Country Clean Sheets
1st Iker Casillas Spain 5
2nd = Joe Hart England 2
2nd = Michalis Sifakis Greece 2
2nd = Rui Patricio Portugal 2
2nd = Gianluigi Buffon Italy 2
  Player Country Games Played Clean Sheets % Clean Sheets vs games
1st Iker Casillas Spain 6 5 83.33%
2nd Michalis Sifakis Greece 3 2 66.67%
3rd Joe Hart England 4 2 50.00%
4th Rui Patricio Portugal 5 2 40.00%
5th Przemyslaw Tyton Poland 3 1 33.33%
  Player Country Clean Sheets Shots on Goal % Clean Sheets vs Shots
1st Iker Casillas Spain 5 16 31.25%
2nd Michalis Sifakis Greece 2 15 13.33%
3rd Rui Patricio Portugal 2 15 13.33%
4th Przemyslaw Tyton Poland 1 9 11.11%
5th Hugo Lloris France 1 11 9.09%
  Player Country Goals Conceded Shots on Goal % Conceded vs Shots
1st Iker Casillas Spain 1 16 6.25%
2nd Joe Hart England 3 33 9.09%
3rd Vyacheslav Malafeev Russia 3 21 14.29%
4th Stipe Pletikosa Croatia 3 18 16.67%
5th Andrij Pyatov Ukraine 4 19 21.05%
  Player Country Games Played Goals Conceded Average conceded/ game
1st Iker Casillas Spain 6 1 0.17
2nd Przemyslaw Tyton Poland 3 2 0.67
3rd Joe Hart England 4 3 0.75
4th Rui Patricio Portugal 5 4 0.80
5th Vyacheslav Malafeev Russia 3 3 1.00

Stats by www.goalkeepingitreal.co.uk

Euro 2012 Goalkeepers – What the stats showed:

In the previous posting http://wp.me/p27nBU-fP it was seen that UEFA had chosen their 3 goalkeepers of the tournament. However what did the stats say… who are the goalkeepers that the stats showed to deserve recognition…

Euro 2012 Stats Part One: The busiest Goalkeeper of the tournament (Shots on goal per game)

Sometimes you have to feel for these Goalkeepers as they have a barrage of shots on goal, meaning that either their team is up against huge fire power or the defence isn’t doing their job or perhaps the team are not taking the action further up the field, meaning that the Goalkeeper has to deal with a lot more shots on goal, which makes the job of keeping a clean sheet that much harder (student Goalkeepers should take note, that it can be difficult to keep clean sheets in such situations – even for the vastly experienced Goalkeepers).

With Spain keeping the ball more than any other team and having one of the best defences, it is unlikely to see Iker Casillas in the top 5 of this stat…

Winner: Shay Given

So the first award, is for the busiest Euro 2012 Goalkeeper and there was none busier than Ireland’s Shay Given who had an incredible average of 10 shots on goal per game. He most definitely deserves this award as throughout the tournament Shay had to put up with tremendous back pain whilst still pulling off some great saves in the processes.

Runner up: Joe Hart

Shay Given was closely followed by England’s Joe Hart who not only from stats claimed to be the second busiest keeper (at an average 8.25 shots per game) but in the last match against Italy had more passes than any other England player… some feat…

The top 5 stats in full:

Player Country Games Played Shots on Goal Shots on per game
1st Shay Given Republic of Ireland 3 30 10.00
2nd Joe Hart England 4 33 8.25
3rd = Vyacheslav Malafeev Russia 3 21 7.00
3rd = Maarten Stekelenburg Holland 3 21 7.00
5th Andrij Pyatov Ukraine 3 19 6.33

Stats by www.goalkeepingitreal.co.uk

Euro 2012 Goalkeepers of the Tournament

So Euro 2012 is now over, with Spain crowned the kings of Europe again. What a tournament –¬†not just for the dazzling goals and outfield action¬†but for the Goalkeeping too!

We saw fantastic examples of Goalkeeping¬†and then again some not so good examples with Arsenal’s Worjciech¬†Szczesny seeing red or¬†seeing errors from Goalkeepers who we have recently seen to have had excellent seasons relatively error free. However to jump to the defence of a number of Goalkeepers here,¬†some of these¬†were errors¬†not because they were poor on judgement, that they had to deal with a very unpredictable ball… As Joe Hart experienced and as only one camera angle caught, the ball flew through the air almost ‘wobbling’ in flight. So Goalkeepers had extra factors to deal with in this tournament rather than the obvious ones…

So with the tournament over, UEFA posted their 23 man squad of the tournament, showing that they felt the 3 best goalkeepers had been:

  • Iker¬†Casillas;
  • Gianluigi Buffon; and
  • Manuer¬†Neuer.

3 quality Goalkeepers who I agree deserve recognition, however what did my followers think and who do the tournament stats say were the best? 

There is still time for you all to vote for your favourite, with polls closing this week. I shall then provide an insight into who else deserves our recognition from this great tournament…¬†

How are the Euro 2012 Goalkeepers performing? Who do you think is the pick of the bunch?

Have you been keeping an eye on those Euro 2012 Goalkeepers?

There have been cracking examples of great Goalkeeping… oh and some¬†not so good examples…¬†across this competition.¬† So have any of the Goalkeepers playing at these European Championships stood out for you as of a different class to all the others at the tournament?

I have now opened up the poll for you to start register your votes as to who you think has been the best.

Please may I ask¬†you to cast the vote based on¬†reviewing all of¬†the Goalkeepers¬†and try not to vote for them¬†because it is¬†your home nation… unless of course they honestly deserve it!

This poll shall close soon after the tournament at which point the results shall be announced.

I look forward to seeing who you choose and of course please feel free to comment as to your reasons why…

Euro 2012 Group D Goalkeepers

The Goalkeepers to Watch in this tournament (if they get their chance)… A quick guide to the Goalkeepers at Euro 2012

PART FOUR – GROUP D

England

Joe Hart, Manchester City FC, Age 25 – Squad Number 1 – 18 senior international appearances prior to this tournament

Robert Green, West Ham United FC, Age 32 – Squad Number 13 – 12 international appearances

Jack Butland, Birmingham City FC, Age 19 – Squad Number 23 – 0 international appearances

France

Hugo Lloris, Olympique Lyonnais, Age 25 – Squad Number 1 – 33 international appearances

Steve Mandana, Marseille, Age 27 – Squad Number 16 – 15 international appearances

Cedric Carasso, Bordeaux, Age 30 – Squad Number 23 – 1 international appearance

Sweden

Andreas Isaksson, PSV Eindhoven, Age 30 – Squad Number 1 – 93 international appearances

Johan Wiland, Copenhagen, Age 31 – Squad Number 12 – 8 international appearances

Par Hansson, Helsingborgs IF, Age 25 – Squad Number 23 – 2 international appearances

image from ca.sports.yahoo.com

Ukraine

Maksym Koval, Dynamo Kiev, Age 19 – Squad Number 1 – 1 international appearance

Andriy Pyatov, Shakhtar Donetsk, Age 27 РSquad Number 12 Р26 international appearances

Oleksandr Goryainov, Metalist Kharkiv, Age 37 РSquad Number 23 Р2 international appearances

image from uk.eurosport.yahoo.com

So with this the final part, you have now been introduced to the 48 Goalkeepers at these European Championships. Only a small selection of these will get their chance, unless of course they get sent-off or injured, then we will see a few more…

Will the French va va¬†voom¬†or the power houses of Schevchenko¬†(Ukraine) and Ibrahimavic¬†(Sweden) take the action away from goal and further up the field, giving their Goalkeeper a break… Hmm… I doubt it, as all group games so far have produced much action¬†with very few clean sheets… Or perhaps¬†could England’s¬†Joe Hart repeat his Manchester City form that got him the Golden Glove Award for his impressive 17 clean sheets in the Premiership or will England’s defence do him no favours… We shall wait and see…

So will any of these be your pick of the tournament…

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